For Restaurants Only

I'm not a big red meat eater but a few times a year, a juicy strip steak hits the spot. It's not something I buy to make at home though; somehow in my mind, steak is for restaurants only. I guess I figure that in my little grill-less kitchen, I can't do a steak justice. 

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Enter the rabbit. I bought this d'Artagnan young rabbit on a whim. Why? I don't know but probably because it was new and different and not raised with antibiotics or growth hormones and because my daughter has recently been staging an "I hate chicken" protest. I have enjoyed eating rabbit in restaurants, though it's not like I've had it a thousand times. I think of myself as an adventurous eater and I figured hey, how about introducing the kiddos to rabbit? 

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So I browsed the web searching for recipes. This one and this one looked interesting. But I lacked time and besides, my littlest one doesn't eat dairy so I would have to substitute oil for butter anyway. Okay let's be honest, I really just wanted to roast it like I do a chicken and see what happened. 

Yeah, I know what you're thinking. It looks like I'm about to roast a squirrel in that dish! Ugh. I seasoned it with salt, pepper, garlic powder, mustard powder, fresh thyme and savory. Before roasting it in the oven at 375, I drizzled the top with a bit of olive oil. 

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I didn't show the kids the final product. I quietly carved it in the kitchen and served it. I told them they were eating rabbit (I don't believe in lying to kids about what they're eating). They all gave it an honest try. Really. My 7 year old said "Mama, I just don't like it. It's too much flavor." Frankly, she was more polite about it than I would have expected. My 3.5 year old was bothered by all of the seasoning. He doesn't like anything with a "crust" and so I usually remove the skin when I serve him chicken. But this little rabbit had no skin, so there was nothing to remove. I removed the top layer of the meat and he took a few bites but then asked for a yogurt instead. My littlest one, now 16 months old, ate it happily. And so it goes. My husband and I feasted, though we both agreed that a better method would have yielded a better turnout. 

Hopefully my kids will be game to try rabbit again at some point. But not at home. I've decided that some things, rabbit included, are only meant to be eaten out.